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20110701
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. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
are extraordinary toppling the taliban pershing al qaeda training afghan forces and under the president pressure killing osama bin laden. meanwhile iraq the troops have battled brittle insurgency country to the iraqi forces, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it's now in their hands. and while it is not always -- not always makes the headlines every day, every single day our forces are serving with distinction and in far-flung corners of the world from western europe to east asia south america, north africa chia strength relentless adversaries the troops have proven themselves, proven to be innovators led by men like admiral mullen who i've always respected but worked with him every day grown to respect him more and more and more for what he has done a. if they pioneered tactics to mastered new languages, developed in the advanced new technologies. junior officers have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals and the responsibilities or extension for beyond the battlefield to politics, development tasks. we were talking about -- i was talking with
been extraordinary. toppling the taliban, pushing al qaeda from afghanistan, safe havens, training afghan forces, putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure and killing osama bin laden. meanwhile in iraq, the troops have battled, trained the forces, given the iraqi people have been opportunity for a better future. it's now in their hands. while it's not always -- it's not always makingings the headlines, every day. every single day our forces are serving with distinction in far formed corners. from west europe, south america, north africa, faced with reless -- relentless adversaries, they have proven to be not only innovators but people like admiral mullen. as they have grown, i have grown to respect him more and more. pioneered tactics, masters languages, deployed new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved only for colonels and generals. the responsibilities have extended far beyond the battlefield, politics, economics, development task. we were talking about -- i was talking with my good buddy about it i think just two days ago. it's astounding. it's a
a number of problems a number of years ago, rising taliban. are we putting those remaining troops at risk? are we going to see higher casualty counts as a result? >> it's likely. the commanders still have the mission to win and they will go about that task as we speak. they're looking at all the options and there are creatives ways they can do that. but with those kind of numbers leaving, they are frankly going to ask our troops to do more with less. that will drive up casualties as a result of this. i just wonder if that was ever given a consideration when these options were being looked at and the commanders' recommendations were being ignored. >> may not send the right message to our troops, but you would like to send a special message to our troops on this fourth of july. what is that? >> thanks for that opportunity. we're the oldest democracy in the world and the rest of the world looks to us as a model for freedom and democracy. this has come at some sacrifice to us and the american people to preserve our liberties and our values. our troops out there today are doing that very thing
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4